Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology

Sunday, 12 / 16 / 2018

Articles

Normothermic Ex-vivo Liver Perfusion and the Clinical Implications for Liver Transplantation

REVIEW ARTICLE

Normothermic Ex-vivo Liver Perfusion and the Clinical Implications for Liver Transplantation

Clifford Akateh*,1, Eliza W. Beal1, Bryan A. Whitson2 and Sylvester M. Black3

1General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA
2Division of Cardiac Surgery, Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA
3Division of Transplant Surgery, Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA

*Correspondence to: Clifford Akateh, General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 395 W 12th Ave, Room 654, Columbus, OH-43210-1267, USA. Tel: +1-614-293-8704, Fax: +1-614-293-4063, E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology 2018;6(3):276-282 DOI: 10.14218/JCTH.2017.00048
Received: July 19, 2017 Accepted: March 1, 2018 Published online: May 4, 2018

Abstract

Despite significant improvements in outcomes after liver transplantation, many patients continue to die on the waiting list, while awaiting an available organ for transplantation. Organ shortage is not only due to an inadequate number of available organs, but also the inability to adequately assess and evaluate these organs prior to transplantation. Over the last few decades, ex-vivo perfusion of the liver has emerged as a useful technique for both improved organ preservation and assessment of organs prior to transplantation. Large animal studies have shown the superiority of ex-vivo perfusion over cold static storage. However, these studies have not, necessarily, been translatable to human livers. Small animal studies have been essential in understanding and improving this technology. Similarly, these results have yet to be translated into clinical use. A few Phase 1 clinical trials have shown promise and confirmed the viability of this technology. However, more robust studies are needed before ex-vivo liver perfusion can be widely accepted as the new clinical standard of organ preservation. Here, we aimed to review all relevant large and small animal research, as well as human liver studies on normothermic ex-vivo perfusion, and to identify areas of deficiency and opportunities for future research endeavors.

Keywords

Liver, Transplantation, Ex-vivo perfusion

 

 

 

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology 2018 vol. 6, 276-282  [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ]

 

© The Authors 2018. This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial License (CC BY-NC 4.0), which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non commercial and is otherwise in compliance with the license.

 

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