Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology

Tuesday, 12 / 12 / 2017

Articles

Rising Rate of Liver Transplantation in the Baby Boomer Generation with Non-alcoholic Steatohepatitis in the United States

ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Rising Rate of Liver Transplantation in the Baby Boomer Generation with Non-alcoholic Steatohepatitis in the United States

Osama Siddique1, Mairin Joseph-Talreja2, Eric R. Yoo3, Ryan B. Perumpail2, George Cholankeril4, Stephen A. Harrison5, Zobair M. Younossi6, Robert J. Wong7 and Aijaz Ahmed*,2

1Department of Medicine, Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island/Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA
2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
3Department of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA
4Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, TN, USA
5Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
6Department of Medicine, Center for Liver Diseases, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Falls Church, VA, USA
7Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Alameda Health System, Highland Hospital, Oakland, CA, USA

*Correspondence to: Aijaz Ahmed, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 750 Welch Road, Suite #210, Stanford, CA 94304, USA. Tel: +1-650-498-5691, Fax: +1-650-498-5692, E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology 2017;5(3):193-196 DOI: 10.14218/JCTH.2017.00003
Received: January 10, 2017 Accepted: May 10, 2017 Published online: June 3, 2017

Abstract

Background and Aims: Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is the most rapidly growing indication for liver transplantation (LT) in the United States and is on a trajectory to become the leading indication for LT in the next decade. We aimed to study the trends in NASH-related LT among persons born between 1945 and 1965, the baby boomer (BB) generation.

Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort analysis using population-based data from the United Network for Organ Sharing/Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network registry from 2004–2015 to evaluate the birth cohort-specific trends in liver transplant waitlist registrations and liver transplant surgeries in patients with NASH. We stratified our study population into three birth cohorts: 1) birth before 1945, 2) birth between 1945 and 1965, and 3) birth after 1965.

Results: The overall rates of NASH-related waitlist registrations and liver transplant surgeries steadily increased from 2004 to 2015 and were reflective of a sharp rise noted in the NASH BB sub-group. From 2004 to 2015, the proportion of BB patients with NASH added to LT waitlist demonstrated an incremental growth, 60.6% in 2004 versus 83.2% in 2015 (p < 0.01). Among the liver transplant recipients with NASH, the proportion represented by the BB cohort increased from 56.3% in 2004 to 80.0% in 2015 (p < 0.01).

Conclusions: We report rising rates of waitlist registration and LT for the indication of NASH. More importantly, the BB sub-cohort was mainly responsible for these alarming trends.

Keywords

Baby boomers, Liver transplantation, Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, Waitlist

 

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology 2017 vol. 5, 193-196  Html ] [ PDF Full-text ]

 

© The Authors 2017. This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial License (CC BY-NC 4.0), which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non commercial and is otherwise in compliance with the license.

 

 logo

You are here: Home